MetalTabs.com - your source for Metal tabs
Home Forum What's New Submit a Tab FAQ Links Contact Us Link to Us


Go Back   MetalTabs.com Forum > Musicians > Gear & Recording
User Name
Password


Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 2007-03-26, 17:52
sqol's Avatar
sqol sqol is offline
Post-whore
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: London, UK
Posts: 1,841
Soul: Your posts are really informative, keep them up I always forget to tin the ends of my wires when soldering- i should know better by now, i've been soldering for years! It seems to be really difficult to find Mogami cable over here in the UK... really irritating, as i'd like to wire my whole rig (rack included) up with 'custom' cut cable.
__________________

The Freedom of Chaos
The Secret of The Secret
The Truth of The Truth

Quote:
Originally Posted by Undone
moonraven?....more like ass raven
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 2007-03-28, 23:34
Grindchord Grindchord is offline
New Blood
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 34
Hey Soulinsane that was some GREAT info!!! I am considering making these Mogami cables myself. Right now I'm using George L's but I hate them because they die randomly due to the "solderless" connection, which is quite scary on a gig as you can imagine! My other big problem with them is how easily they tangle. Almost unnaceptable. How are these Mogami cables for onstage use? I run around a lot and every cable I have ever used tangles up badly. I need something that won't do that unless I use it as a lasso haha! Considering how cheap it is to build these and the fact that my soldering skills are decent (I have built effects pedals and re-wired many guitars) I feel these are the best deal possible, for a great sounding cable. They are cheaper than the George L's for sure.
__________________
-------------
GEAR:

*White '76 RI Explorer
*Blue Ibanez RG520QS
*BYOC overdive, chorus
*MXR Phase 90, Blue Box
*SD Pickup Booster
*EB JR volume
*Marshall JCM800 2210 head
*Marshall JCM800 4x12 cab w/Vintage 30's
*Line 6 Spider II 30 1x12 practice amp
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 2007-03-30, 15:37
Soulinsane's Avatar
Soulinsane Soulinsane is offline
Pirate Lawd
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hanger 18
Posts: 6,520
Mogami is a tough cable so it would have no problem being used onstage, but don't expect it to last for ever. Walking on, pulling on, and bending the cable will reduce its life over time. W2524 cable has a flex life of 15,000 bends, which is really good, but no cable last forever.

I'm not sure if it tangles less than other cables, but give it a shot. I always find myself turning one way when I play guitar and that makes the cable want to coil up.

Edit: Solderless plugs fucking suck. You are right about them failing all the time, plus they have poor connection with the cable conductors. I can't blame Goerge L for trying though because it would be hard to sell a cable kit with a solder iron.
__________________
Authorized Mercury Magnetics tech/dealer

Last edited by Soulinsane : 2007-03-30 at 15:45.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 2007-03-30, 19:05
Jopop's Avatar
Jopop Jopop is offline
Senior Metalhead
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Norway
Posts: 398
+1 on the solderless. It's horrible. I myself solder everything in audio, no god damn cable connectors on anything. If i have to use a screw-on terminal i tin the wire, tin the terminal, screw together and solder them together. This is a decent upgrade to your George L's, very recommended. Also, the transfer resistance on a screw-on terminal is pretty damn high compared to soldering it on - we're talking 0,2 ohms versus 0,0002 ohms. Stuff like that actually makes a difference with a complex low-voltage signal.


People in "pro" car audio solder the speaker cable directly onto the speaker terminals instead of using the more common cable connectors.. It has to be for a reason
__________________
Proud member of the "$20000 worth of pro gear but can't play worth shit" squad
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 2007-03-30, 19:35
Soulinsane's Avatar
Soulinsane Soulinsane is offline
Pirate Lawd
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hanger 18
Posts: 6,520
I agree completely, but you got to be damn careful when soldering near a speaker. The magnet will attract the solder iron like crazy and if it pulls it out of your hand... the hot iron tip could end up in the speaker cone.

I seen someone have that happen once. The speaker was completely ruined.
__________________
Authorized Mercury Magnetics tech/dealer
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 2007-04-18, 01:48
Soulinsane's Avatar
Soulinsane Soulinsane is offline
Pirate Lawd
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hanger 18
Posts: 6,520
Speaker cab foam mod

This is a super easy mod to be done to just about any speaker cab to tighten low end and low mid range response. It will eliminate a cabs tendency to sound boomy by lowering the noise peak resonance frequencies while at the same time extending the low end frequency a few Hz.

But first, while you have the cab open, it is a good time to inspect your speaker wiring, speaker mounting, cab structure strength, and the cabs seal integrity.

Speaker wire inspection: If you have not read the speaker wire mod I posted earlier in this thread then now would be a good time to do so. Upgrading your wiring is a higher priority than added foam.

Speaker mount inspection: Make sure the speaker(s) bolt all the way through the baffle, even if front mounted, with a T-nuts ( or clamps or normal nuts) and bolt screws. Most cabs use "nut and bolt" mounting but a few cabs use just wood screws. This will not provide the speaker seal(s) with proper tension and the speaker(s) will eventually vibrate badly and fall off the baffle. Replace "screwed in" speaker mounting with "nut and bolt" type speaker mounting.

If you have "nut and bolt" mounting then give each nut screw an even tension twist with a screw driver, but not to much or you will strip the threads. Just make sure nothing is loose and every "nut and bolt" have an even amount of tension. Its critical to insure the speaker seals effectively against the baffle board.

Cab structure inspection: Most cabs use glue to hold the joints together in conjunction with internal bracing 1x1' batons stapled or glue in to better seal the cab. I guess its a cheap and good way to make cabs, but it can be strengthened further. It's not necessary in most cases but if you want to strengthen the cab structure then just add wood screws through the 1x1' baton bracing into the cab shell. I suggest predrilling the screws unless you want the bracing batons to split. Once done you should be able to hide behind your cab during a nuclear attack and feel safe.

Cab seal integrity inspection: Now this is critical, even if you have a ported or open back cab; and most important for closed back cabs as no air should ever escape. A cab needs to be sealed air tight to prevent air from escaping where is shouldn't for many reasons. I would love to explain everything but it took me endless hours of researching detailed material to see why it is important. It would take me pages to explain, so I would rather get right to the simple methods of how to properly seal a cab.

Get some caulking and go over ever bracing baton corner within the cab. Do not use it around the speaker(s)! A speaker has its own seal so no need for added sealing.

Around the handles and removable back board use a weatherstrip tape to seal the cab.

FYI: I took shit a step further and built an air tight isolation box around my jack port. I did this because I could see light around the jack so I knew it wasn't air tight. I used wood, glue, wood screws, and caulking to completely seal the jack box. Now my cab is completely sealed.

Inspection and preparation is now done, time to add foam.

There are many expensive sound damping foams. Inside a cab there is no need for expensive foam unless you have money to burn for bragging rights. I bought a single twin bed egg crate foam mattress at Walmart for $10. It's not pretty but no one will see it inside the cab. It is made of the same stuff and works the same as the expensive audio foam. Don't stuff the cab with blue jeans or popcorn foam... please. Its to dense and not porous enough to brake up standing sound waves.

You don't want foam in contact with the speakers, so don't add foam to the speaker baffle. Parallel solid surfaces benefit the most from having foam attached. A cab doesn't have to be packed with foam to achieve the desired effect. Use 3m glue spray on the foam surface to be attached and then stick it to the inside of the cab. Don't spray the glue inside the cab! Other glue will work too but allow a few days to cure. I use wood glue on my foam and it is still holding strong.

How does it work and what about space reduction inside the cab? The needed foam for this mod should be porous and if compressed into a solid block of foam should only consume several cubic inches. Its reduction on cab airspace is effectively null. Depending on how dense the foam is ( profession audio foam used on studio walls is very dense ) it could take more of less relative space inside the cab. Since most egg crate foam is so porous and air creates most of its volume, a cabs inside airspace with foam remains about the same. The speakers still have far more than ample airspace to work safely and effectively for their natural lives. What is important about foam is that air vibrated by the speaker(s) becomes dampened once contacted by the foam. The foam absorbs the energy/vibrations and doesn't bounce it back like solid wood surfaces. These bounced back vibrations are called standing waves ( like an echo ) and will influence speaker vibration in a unwanted way.

Foam will destroy standing waves, kill boomy tone, and expand lower end frequency response. Bass cabs and closed back guitar cabs see the best results from this mod.

If there are any questions then please post them.

The result.
From a different angle.

Good luck
__________________
Authorized Mercury Magnetics tech/dealer

Last edited by Soulinsane : 2007-04-18 at 13:50.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 2007-04-18, 10:47
Valtiel's Avatar
Valtiel Valtiel is offline
Supreme Metalhead
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: West Coast
Posts: 839
Send a message via AIM to Valtiel Send a message via MSN to Valtiel
I love Soulinsane.
__________________
"So often our hands get caught up in ruts of muscle memory. 'Muscle memory' is an accurate term. We get used to doing certain things, without even being aware of them. This ultimately not only shapes and therefore limits our technique, it also shapes what we compose, what we write. We end up thinking still unknowingly trapped in that box." -Adam Nitti

Quote:
Originally Posted by the_bleeding
buy a stick of graphite (art stores) and rub it into your nut
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 2007-04-18, 11:34
JOAMdude's Avatar
JOAMdude JOAMdude is offline
Post-whore
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Candyland
Posts: 1,542
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valtiel
I love Soulinsane.


^
this might be my fave thread
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 2007-04-18, 13:39
Jopop's Avatar
Jopop Jopop is offline
Senior Metalhead
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Norway
Posts: 398
Great mod. Mods like those turn a cab from budget shit to something boutique sounding. The difference between a leaking cab and a properly sealed one is insane.
__________________
Proud member of the "$20000 worth of pro gear but can't play worth shit" squad
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 2007-05-01, 18:02
Valtiel's Avatar
Valtiel Valtiel is offline
Supreme Metalhead
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: West Coast
Posts: 839
Send a message via AIM to Valtiel Send a message via MSN to Valtiel
So I finally did the foam mod, whoa!! Cab got really punchy in the low end, didnt think I would notice that much of a difference, but I was wrong! Soulinsane, im pretty sure I got the exact same foam as you, $11.99 at Target. Used Krylon spray adhesive and a hefty staple gun to attach it on the back, bottom, and sides. Awesome mod!
__________________
"So often our hands get caught up in ruts of muscle memory. 'Muscle memory' is an accurate term. We get used to doing certain things, without even being aware of them. This ultimately not only shapes and therefore limits our technique, it also shapes what we compose, what we write. We end up thinking still unknowingly trapped in that box." -Adam Nitti

Quote:
Originally Posted by the_bleeding
buy a stick of graphite (art stores) and rub it into your nut
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 2007-05-01, 22:59
Soulinsane's Avatar
Soulinsane Soulinsane is offline
Pirate Lawd
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hanger 18
Posts: 6,520
Awesome I'm glad to know the mod turned out good for you. I personally will never own another cab without foam.

I'm trying to come up with a new easy mod but I can't think of anything safe. I don't want people to try dangerous DIY mods just because I said go for it! The worse that can happen with the foam mod is you glue your fingers together.

Any one got any mods, ideals, or questions?
__________________
Authorized Mercury Magnetics tech/dealer
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 2007-05-02, 00:28
Valtiel's Avatar
Valtiel Valtiel is offline
Supreme Metalhead
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: West Coast
Posts: 839
Send a message via AIM to Valtiel Send a message via MSN to Valtiel
Hey, thank you for posting it! Although im thinking about removing small sections of the foam in certain places because resonance inside the cab can still be a good thing. Do you have any other types of mods, maybe some for amps? Im not concerned about danger, have worked with amps before.
__________________
"So often our hands get caught up in ruts of muscle memory. 'Muscle memory' is an accurate term. We get used to doing certain things, without even being aware of them. This ultimately not only shapes and therefore limits our technique, it also shapes what we compose, what we write. We end up thinking still unknowingly trapped in that box." -Adam Nitti

Quote:
Originally Posted by the_bleeding
buy a stick of graphite (art stores) and rub it into your nut
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 2007-05-02, 17:25
Jopop's Avatar
Jopop Jopop is offline
Senior Metalhead
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Norway
Posts: 398
I have lots of tone mods and the like available to amps. Thing is, an amplifier is seriously dangerous business - you don't want to poke around in one unless you know what you are doing.

This is not a mod - this is required reading before you unscrew the first chassis screw.

AMP SECURITY 101 - THE 10 RULES OF AMP SAFETY

Rule 1: There are no exceptions to any rules described in this document.

By no exceptions, I mean no exceptions. Even in the case of "oh damnit i forgot to solder on that little point, It'll just be a brief second" the rules apply. No matter what, you need to obey all the rules described in this document.

Rule two: Think of the power switch as faulty.

The power switch is not a good enough barrier between you and the AC mains, unplug the cord going into the wall or into the amp.

Rule three: Unplugging your amplifier from the wall does not mean it cannot kill you.

An amplifier's power supply contains fairly large capacitors with pretty high voltage and max current storage capabilities. You need to properly discharge these before you can start working inside your amp.

Rule four - Put one hand in your pocket when working on an amp that might carry high voltages.

If you should get burned on your one hand the worst thing that might happen are minor burns. However, if the current flows from one hand, through your heart, and out your other hand, there's a possibility you might die or you blood might go acidic. The chassis of your amp is actually connected to one end of the power supply (reference, usually 0 volts) or ground (or in most cases both). Having one hand touching the chassis while the other reaches in to measure some voltage while the amp is "live" or discharging capacitors with one hand on the chassis and the other shorting the caps can be lethal.

Rule five - Don't work on an amp together with other people that might distract you.

People who ask "What're you doing? What does that do?" might break your concentration just enough to slip your tools somewhere they shouldn't be, causing damage to you or your amplifier. Don't talk on the phone either. Stay focused.

Rule six - Things might blow up, protect your eyes and face.

Capacitors, diodes, resistors et cetera might blow up if you use the wrong value component or wire it wrong. This is just like setting off a small hand grenade, it might make you blind. Close the chassis or wear glasses that cover your eye when you power up your amp. Don't sit with your face unprotected over it.

Rule seven - Solder might drip.

Wear pants long enough to cover your socks, and wear socks. And, at least wear a t-shirt. Solder dripping on your knee or feet not only hurts, but leaves permanent marks as well.

Rule eight - Don't wear metallic objects.

Off with jewelry, rings and watches and other metal stuff on your hand. Also, don't wear a necklace that might fall down into the amp shorting stuff. Piercings in your face, ears, or on your body other than your hands is okay.

Rule nine - Use your common sense, don't do anything stupid.

This rule explains itself. Don't put your coke bottle on top of your chassis while working in there, stuff like that.

Rule ten - If in doubt, ask.

Don't assume something will be okay, maybe it won't. No question is stupid when it comes to safety.

Well that should be a pretty damn comprehensive safety rules list.

How to decharge capacitors

1. Make sure you followed the safety list from top to bottom.

2. Open up the amp. Wait 10 minutes or so before doing anything else.

3. Locate the power supply capacitors. They are cylindric in shape, and have two or more ("multi-section" capacitor) leads going out from the "shell". They're generally one color with a black, grey or white stripe or arrow pointing towards one of the leads. Looks like this:
http://www.germes-online.com/direct...c_Capacitor.jpg
or
http://www.germes-online.com/direct...c_Capacitor.jpg

As you can see there might be one lead in each end or several coming out from one end.

4. Drain the caps. There are several ways to do this. You could either short the capacitor, by deinsulating a wire a little bit in each end, and connecting one lead on the capacitor to the other lead (REMEMBER RULE FOUR). There'll be a small pop and a flash, but it's nothing to worry about. Leave it there for 10 seconds or so, then go on to the next one.

The other way (which i prefer) is connecting a switch and a 50K resistor between a preamp tube's plate and ground. Solder a wire onto pin 1 on a preamp tube socket.

Here's the pinout for 12A*7, ECC 8* and so on: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:EIA-9A.png

Solder the other end of the wire to one leg of a 50K 5 watt resistor. Solder the other resistor leg to one lug of a simple SPST switch. Remember rule four. These are like $0.1. Now solder a wire to the other lug on the SPST switch. Solder the other end of that wire to a ground point, or solder it / screw it down to the chassis (but not a painted area, paint is not a good conductor). And remember rule four. Now anytime you'll be working on your amp, just turn the switch on, wait 5 minutes, measure the voltage over the 50K resistor, and if it's under 10 volts or so you're good to go. If not, wait a little while longer.

Remember to turn the switch off again before testing out any modifications. Leaving it on won't harm anything, but it'll decrease the plate voltage on one triode (creating a voltage divider), meaning shitloads of distortion and (in most cases) bad sound. Leave the switch engaged while working inside the amp.

Make sure you get a five-watt resistor, they're quite a bit sturdier and won't break as easily. A two-watt or even less should also be fine in all cases but the 5-watt is best anyway, and is not that much more.

Now start modding

List the mods you want explained, i.e. more/less gain, more/less bass, more/less treble, less buzzy tone, darker / brighter tone, more low mids, more high mids, tighter bass, more clarity or similar, if i know how to do it I'll try to explain.

__________________
Proud member of the "$20000 worth of pro gear but can't play worth shit" squad

Last edited by Jopop : 2007-05-02 at 17:34.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 2007-05-02, 21:11
Valtiel's Avatar
Valtiel Valtiel is offline
Supreme Metalhead
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: West Coast
Posts: 839
Send a message via AIM to Valtiel Send a message via MSN to Valtiel
Wow, this could get fun...

My other guitarists Laney GH100L is a little harsh in the upper ranges, my Laney VH100R does not have this problem which is strange because they should have the same drive channel, but the GH100L is an older version and might be built different. Basically, smoothing out the high end would be good.
__________________
"So often our hands get caught up in ruts of muscle memory. 'Muscle memory' is an accurate term. We get used to doing certain things, without even being aware of them. This ultimately not only shapes and therefore limits our technique, it also shapes what we compose, what we write. We end up thinking still unknowingly trapped in that box." -Adam Nitti

Quote:
Originally Posted by the_bleeding
buy a stick of graphite (art stores) and rub it into your nut
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 2007-05-03, 05:09
Jopop's Avatar
Jopop Jopop is offline
Senior Metalhead
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Norway
Posts: 398
According to the schematics, they differ on very few points - the voltage in the VH100R is quite a bit higher, and one capacitor in what looks like a low pass filter is actually smaller, which should result in a less smooth sound (the exact opposite of what you're saying). I may be wrong though, I'm not too good at spotting different functions in a schematic. The things that obviously differ are the transformers, which has an impact on the overall sound (esp. the output transformer). Your tubes and guitar make a difference too.. Your amp should also feel a bit tighter at high bass settings and also be a bit less muddy and cleaner at high-gain, but the differences are quite small.

Anyway, on to the mod -

http://www.schematicheaven.com/newamps/laney_gh100l.pdf
Page 3.
Right after V2a you see C9, which is 22 nanofarads. For fun, try swapping it out with a 470 picofarad one, i don't really see how it will help, but it will make his drive channel exactly the same as yours (this exact circuit puzzles me, it seems like a lowpass filter and a voltage divider, but I'm probably wrong).

Now, if that doesn't work, move on to right past V3a, where the tone stack is. Replace C17 with a 680p silver mica, and test the amp. If you still feel it's too harsh sounding, try replacing C22 with a 33nF Orange Drop, this will make the amp a tad bit warmer and darker. If it's still not enough try a 47nF, it will give lots of low mids and not so much high mids, very warm sound.

http://www.tube-town.net/ttstore/in...15P-Series.html
http://www.tube-town.net/ttstore/in...ilver-Mica.html

Doesn't have to be these brands, but they have a good name.. not that it should matter. You could just as well try radio shack, make sure you get mica and polypropylene caps (mica for the really small ones, polypropylene for the others). Don't get polyester film, they're for vintage freaks who like noise and distorting capacitors (which is not good for high gain).
__________________
Proud member of the "$20000 worth of pro gear but can't play worth shit" squad
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 2007-05-29, 10:45
Jopop's Avatar
Jopop Jopop is offline
Senior Metalhead
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Norway
Posts: 398
Q: My amp is a little too buzzy / harsh but otherwise i think it rocks, what do i do?!?

A: Well, usually this is caused by higher harmonics which may sound harsh or buzzy. There are many ways to get rid of them, but this is the easiest and my fav. by far. What you need is one or more 1nF capacitors. Get polypropylene film type if you can, they're the best type for tube amps.

Wire one 1nF capacitor in parallel over the plate resistor of a preamp tube. Generally speaking, the second-last gain stage is the most effective point, followed by the last one. To find the second-last stage, look at the schematic for your amp and look at the plate load resistors. They will usually be 100k, but one or two of them will be larger, like 150k, 220k or even 330k. The gain stage with the large plate resistors creates the most gain and high harmonics, so this is the best place to put the capacitor (for starters). If there are two or more gain stages with large plate resistors try modding the one that comes last in the signal chain first.

Solder one end of the 1nF cap to one end of the plate load resistor, and the other end of the cap to the other end of the plate load resistor. Thats it. If you still feel you need more, try soldering another 1nF cap on top of the 1nF cap you already put in, and if that smoothed it out too much take the cap out again and try adding a 1nF cap over the plate resistor of the gain stage that comes next in the signal chain.

I uploaded a engl blackmore schematic showing where the extra capacitor goes, it's drawn in red so it's easy to make out, so you can see which resistor is the plate load resistor and which gain stage you usually want to be modding (the one with the biggest plate load resistor).



This mod will smooth the amp out quite a lot but not make it that much darker, if you want a darker sound i have another easy mod..
Attached Images
File Type: gif englmod.gif (8.8 KB, 134 views)
__________________
Proud member of the "$20000 worth of pro gear but can't play worth shit" squad

Last edited by Jopop : 2007-06-01 at 10:46.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 2007-05-29, 22:54
philkilla's Avatar
philkilla philkilla is offline
Crusher of Skulls
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Somewhere down the road
Posts: 2,188
Send a message via AIM to philkilla Send a message via MSN to philkilla Send a message via Yahoo to philkilla
Damn...this thread kicks ass.


I did Souls Cab mod ages ago, but I'm not quite sure where the pics are now.

It definitely tightened it up quite a bit....and it's no cheap cab to begin with.

It is a new Crate Blue Voodoo cab, and the benefit was great!
__________________


My Trust is in WHISKEY and WEEDand SLAYER
Long live DIMEBAG
ROGspace Cunts. Book us


Quote:
Originally Posted by far_beyond_sane
You thought of mixing wheat flour with saturated fat, and putting it the resultant shit in a styrofoam cup. Shine on, you crazy dead yellow diamond.

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmansley
May the best cunt win.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 2007-05-30, 10:56
Jopop's Avatar
Jopop Jopop is offline
Senior Metalhead
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Norway
Posts: 398
--- Tone stack mods ---

Q: I want more "roar" instead of "buzz"/sizzle/chainsaw! And i want more low end!! Please

A: Well, if you want a more "roaring" sound instead of a chainsaw-like buzz, you need some way to decrease the amount of high mids in your amp. Luckily enough this is easy on most amp that have a traditional tone stack.

There's an easy way to add in low end too. It won't make that much of a difference if you tune to E standard, but if you tune to B or use a seven-string it will make all the difference in the world. Be warned that this mod also lets you scoop out your mids a tiny bit more, so if you usually run mids on 4 run it on 4.5 after the mod.

What you need to decrease the value of the treble capacitance in the tone stack and increase the bass capacitance.

The following example is from the 5150, since i did this exact same mod today on my 5150.

The treble capacitor in this tone stack is a little strange, there are actually two of them. There is one that's 470pF, and one 100pF wired in parallel with the 470p. When you parallel wire capacitors the capacitance increases, so total capacitance of the treble caps is 570pF. This is a very large value and it accounts for a lot of the chainsaw-like sound of the 5150, the amounts of high midrange is absolutely insane. What you need to do is decrease the vaue of the capacitor(s). The first thing to try on the 5150 is to just cut the legs of the 100pF and remove the whole thing from the circuit, reducing the capacitance to 470p. This is still pretty high, but might just be enough for some (it was enough for me). The treble caps in the 5150 look nothing like ordinary caps, they look just like resistors. They are blue and located between the treble and the mid control. The 100pF one can be identified by it's color code, it starts with a brown ring. If you can't be bothered, well it's the one closest to the mid control. Just cut it out and see if you like it. If it's not enough, cut the 470p out of the circuit too and try soldering a 330pF or 220pF in it's place. 220pF is as low as i would go, below that you would lose a lot of aggressiveness! Remember to cut the legs off the components as close to the component body as possible so you can solder the new components on the existing legs (so you don't have to screw the main board out! saves a lot of work).

To add low end, look just above the treble pot for a small, yellow capacitor. It's right next to a jumper (a jumper is just a bare wire). Cut the bastard out (the stock caps suck ass by the way), remember to leave the legs of the components there! I would just clip the fucker in half so the legs are longer. Now, solder a capacitor on there. I used 100nF (or 0.1F), you may experiment with 47nF, 68nF, 100nF, 150nF and 220nF. There is hardly any difference between 100nF and 10000nF so i wouldn't bother with anything higher than 100nF (the tone just gets more scooped after 100nF), and if you find there's too much bass after the mod try a 47nF. This is a huge improvement if you like to play 7 strings or tune lower than D, the low end chugging will kick ass after the mod.

Note: as always, use polypropylene capacitors. For the treble caps you can use silver mica, they're good too. I like Xicon brand polypropylene caps, they're inexpensive and sound great. Other favorites are Orange Drops and Mallory's, but i can't really hear the difference between an Orange Drop and a Xicon, and the Xicon costs 1/3rd of the price.

See the attached image for details

The procedure will be similar for all amps with a similar tonestack.
Attached Images
File Type: gif 5150-tone-stack-modded.gif (7.9 KB, 144 views)
__________________
Proud member of the "$20000 worth of pro gear but can't play worth shit" squad

Last edited by Jopop : 2007-06-01 at 10:46.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 2007-05-30, 18:23
Soulinsane's Avatar
Soulinsane Soulinsane is offline
Pirate Lawd
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hanger 18
Posts: 6,520
Nice mods, Jopop I love how that cap mod on the gain plate resistor works as a voltage regulator. Simple and easy.
__________________
Authorized Mercury Magnetics tech/dealer
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 2007-05-31, 15:54
the_bleeding's Avatar
the_bleeding the_bleeding is offline
Post-whore
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 1,816
Send a message via MSN to the_bleeding
this is exactly what i've been waiting for

hows the new 5150 sound by the way Jopop?
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dahmers Fridge
In the US "fanny" is a word used to describe the ass or butt. Here in the UK "fanny" is a lady garden (vagina)
I was very bemused as a youngster watching the Golden Girls when Blanche said she was going to "spank her fanny" I had visions of a geriatric vertical bacon sandwich red and bruised from being disciplined!!!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 14:55.


========

Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Disclaimer
Copyright © 2001-2009 MetalTabs.com. All Rights Reserved.
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2009, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.