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Old 2005-03-29, 18:52
Kylito Kylito is offline
Supreme Metalhead
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Where the slime live...
Posts: 868
Quote:
Originally Posted by guitar_demon
ok so now that i have read this...
kylito were in the air force or navy? sometimes it seemed like one over the other (going to a fleet, that a navy thing but you mention shit about air force)

Navy. I was in charge of our ship's self-defense missile systems, one 3-D air search/track radar, and one 2-D air search/track radar.

Quote:
Originally Posted by guitar_demon
did those weekly test happen in basic or the school you went into afterwards?

Just in schools. I had 36 weeks of advanced electronics theory and 8 weeks of system training for the missile systems.

Quote:
Originally Posted by guitar_demon
and did you say navy boot camp was hard?? it MUST have changed from when my dad went. (late 70's early 80's sometime) cause hes always talking about how it was a fucking joke (speaking of, when he went in it was the navy camp right next the marine camp, and this one guy couldnt hack navy camp so he hopped the fence, unknowingly ending in marine camp hahahaha)

It's hard for everyone in one way or another. It was hard for me to not laugh at everyone and to not punch certain people in the face because I was 22 and had already been out in the world. I imagine John will have an easy time of it if he keeps his composure. It is extremely hard for fresh out of high school kids who have led sheltered lives. We had two suicide attempts and a whole lot of drama in my company. One of my brothers was Army and they had a lot worse than anything I ever saw including a training death. My dad was Navy way back in the day and it was totally different. Back then the instructors could beat your ass up for real and one wacky punishment my dad had to endure was smoking an entire pack of unfiltered cigarettes inside a trash can over your head. These days if you're caught smoking a cigarette during basic training you'll be punished severely. Deaths for various reasons in basic training are a lot more common than you might imagine and it typically only costs the military $200,000 in insurance money.

Quote:
Originally Posted by guitar_demon
basically, im thinking of joining the air force sometime(my dad talked me into that over the other branches) to be a translator (for norwegian )
i know some but not alot, if you go in for that they will send you to school for it right? do any of your military guys know translators or have/had contact with them how did they like their jobs? what exactly do they do. if you become a translator do they send you to that country? if they do and there are no bases (like norway) do they send you to an embassy or someting to help out? i heard they pick the language for you (??) but i figure i already know basics in norwegian and i doubt its a popular language so i have a shot at getting promised that right?

That's probably a special case. For instance, you can join as a musician if you are already professional and come in with a higher rank like E-6 right off the bat. They even have Navy rock bands that tour around as good will recruiters and do covers of popular music. Translator billets would likely be few and far between and preference will always be given to people who are already fluent. If you are serious about this start talking to the recruiters now and keep working on learning the language. I doubt there is a big demand for Norwegian in particular, but by the same token there probably aren't a lot of eligible U.S. citizens who speak Norwegian and want to join. If they need someone and no one fluent wants to join under normal terms, they will offer large enlistment bonuses long before they go to the trouble to teach someone that kind of thing. Your training would likely be purely relating to military aspects of being a translator and maybe a review course to verify you are in fact fluent and speak the dialect they are in need of. As far as where you would end up, I have no idea. I'm sure embassies and such are largely handled by DOD or civilian translators.

Quote:
Originally Posted by guitar_demon
also before you join your job is already determined and unless you fuck up big time in basic it will stay the same right? i dont wanna go in thinking ill do one thing then get fucked over

You need to have your school guaranteed in writing on your contract. A classic trick is for your recruiter to tell you that you can get a school after boot camp and do exactly what you want to do. This is bullshit. And yes, even with the contract, they can do whatever they want with you if you screw up. Even if you don't screw up, you may not get what you were promised. I was in a "pushbutton" school which means that upon graduation from technical 'A' School I would get automatic advancement to E-4 provided my record was clean. Everyone who enlisted three weeks after I did in that school had that promise yanked from them unless it was spelled out on their contract (only two guys had it spelled out). They had to go to the fleet as E-3's and had to wait 6 months before advancement to E-4. This typically meant that they would end up doing galley duty for three months upon arrival to the ship whereas E-4's are typically exempt from that shit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by guitar_demon
i know i SHOULD go to a recruiter for this kinda shit, but i know for a fact that they will hash out some shit to get me to join and im in no mood to fuck with those bastards ( i remember them coming to high school, they hardly knew shit and just gave the most basic and brawd answers)

Recruiters have commission type benefits and other incentives which means that they will not tell you anything you don't want to hear and they will often lie to you straight out. A lot of the helpers at the recruiter's office are usually new guys who are still gung ho and they have no clue what the fuck they are talking about yet. They are typically grunts volunteering during their vacation leave in exchange for advancement to E-2 or E-3. You need to inquire specifically about the college fund in addition to the G.I. Bill because they will not bring it up. You need to have the college fund, your school, any advancement guarantees, and all bonus guarantees spelled out clearly on your contract. You need to know that even after your initial swearing in, you can still walk before you go to boot camp. After you swear in immediately prior to boot camp is when they truly own your ass. Our company commander gave us one opportunity to leave if we wanted to. Nobody raised their hand, but one kid went up to him 5 minutes later and said he wanted to go home. It was too late and this kid's life became a living hell. He was one of the later suicide attempts. These guys will try to rush you and get you to sign up and swear in before you've had time to think about it or shop around to the other services. They will try to push you into a particular job classification that they get extra bonuses for. Always walk away at first and make them wait it out a bit, but seem interested. Talk to other services and try to beef up your enlistment bonus. Demand a particular boot camp location instead of letting them pick for you. I was left alone with my enlistment contract and if I had been thinking straight, I would have written in some modifications and initialed them like "I can submit two weeks notice at any time and receive an immediate honorable discharge". It would have been worth a shot at least. Keep in mind the guys at the processing center are typically sloppy and in a rush. They are used to people following the rules and are not too sharp. Once you sign the contract, then they sign the contract. Once they sign the contract it is binding and I think they would be amused that you got away with something like that. The officer who signed off on it would probably get fried and a memo would be sent out specifying that these guys check for such modifications.
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