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-   -   Out of Key! (http://metaltabs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=37210)

Schizoid 2007-05-11 10:00

Out of Key!
 
Hello Metal Heads,

There is one thing that has been confusing for a long time. I've realized when I analyze a lot of classical music they mostly never stick to one key. Even when the songs are called for example Concerto in C major; a lot of the notes are not in the C major! I don't understand that. When they refer to the key do they mean it as the main key of the song and they modulate out of the key at numerous times? I think this is the logic. Any feedback on this would be great.

Thank You All!

Unanything 2007-05-11 10:05

You got to realise that the music is based in C major, but then they might use notes from outside to add in a different sound.

davie_gravy 2007-05-11 13:44

Good musicians follow the chord. So while a progression might be based out of C major. The chords of C major scale (C - Dm - Em - F - G - Am - Bdim) contain minor chords as well so many players will play that specfic scale ((any) D minor scale over a Dm chord, (any) Em scale over a Em chord) or pull specific tones from that scale to add color.

aslkvbiwbegv 2007-05-11 15:09

Quote:
Originally Posted by Schizoid
Hello Metal Heads,

There is one thing that has been confusing for a long time. I've realized when I analyze a lot of classical music they mostly never stick to one key. Even when the songs are called for example Concerto in C major; a lot of the notes are not in the C major! I don't understand that. When they refer to the key do they mean it as the main key of the song and they modulate out of the key at numerous times? I think this is the logic. Any feedback on this would be great.

Thank You All!


Yes, they switch keys. Usually they start and end on the same key and modulate to other keys in between. Some classical forms even include the key changes.

PutridWinds 2007-05-11 21:05

Even when the music says that it's in C major, the composer may often go to the Dominant key (G major) which has one accidental, or the subdominant key (F major) which also has one accidental. In addition, the use of scales like the harmonic and melodic minor scales will also create accidentals in the music, as will chords like diminished 7 chords. :)

powersofterror 2007-05-14 08:42

It's called the Corelli protocol.

Unanything 2007-05-17 06:04

I noticed they do a lot of that in stuf that's in sonata form, especially during the recapitulation.

powersofterror 2007-05-17 07:54

Mainly no, that happens in the development section, not the recapitulation.

Unanything 2007-05-17 09:41

Quote:
Originally Posted by powersofterror
Mainly no, that happens in the development section, not the recapitulation.


Well, yeah, but usually they bring back the original theme with bits from the sub-dominant and dominant keys, at least in many that we studied in Music.

Plus you could have the same key but a completely different melody in the development.

powersofterror 2007-05-19 19:45

It doesn't matter how much the other sections change, the point and basic definition of the devolopment section is to fuck around and change what had been musically stated already.

Unanything 2007-05-20 07:08

Quote:
Originally Posted by powersofterror
It doesn't matter how much the other sections change, the point and basic definition of the devolopment section is to fuck around and change what had been musically stated already.


OK OK!

powersofterror 2007-05-21 11:14

:rolleyes:....just fuckin' around....

-Richard Pryor

Corruption 2008-02-17 14:12

Ya they switch keys to add more notes, but they usually end w/ the same key + note as they started with, excluding annacrusi

rockitmarty 2009-07-20 20:07

Out of Key!
 
They're suppose to modulate, its part of the forms.


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